Dominio de Pingus

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Country of Origin: Spain
Location: La Horra, Ribera del Duero
People: Peter Sisseck, Owner & Winemaker
Viticulture: Practicing Biodynamic

Items

Dominio de Pingus 2016 'Flor de Pingus' Ribera Del Duero DO Login WA 95 In Stock
Dominio de Pingus 2017 'Flor de Pingus' Ribera Del Duero DO Login
Dominio de Pingus 2011 'Pingus' Ribera Del Duero DO Login IWC 94 WA (94-96) WA 95 In Stock
Dominio de Pingus 2016 'Pingus' Ribera Del Duero DO Login WA 98-100 Please inquire
Dominio de Pingus 2017 'Pingus' Ribera Del Duero DO Login Please inquire
Dominio de Pingus 2017 'PSI' Ribera del Duero DO Login <1 Case

While other Spanish wines have achieved international recognition, Pingus is one of the very few that has joined the ranks of the world’s most coveted wines. Like Coche-Dury’s Corton-Charlemagne, Guigal’s single-vineyard Côte Rôties, or Giacomo Conterno’s Monfortino, Pingus is known and revered wherever great wine is discussed.

Like those other esteemed names, Pingus has a quality that is often lacking in today’s “modern” wines—a sense of utter individuality. For there is no other wine in the world today that shares Pingus’ unique signature and, ultmately, that singularity is one of the fundamental requirements for great wine.

The Early Years
Pingus is produced by the visionary Danish winemaker Peter Sisseck. Peter arrived in Spain in 1993 to manage a new project, Hacienda Monasterio. While planting and developing Monasterio, he began to dream about the old vines he saw dotted around the Ribera del Duero landscape. By the 1995 vintage, Peter had found a group of old vines that spurred him to embark on his own project. He called it “Pingus,” after his childhood nickname.

One can only imagine what the reactions were like when Peter showed up in Bordeaux at the March 1996 en primeur tastings. Yet, by the end of the week, Pingus was perhaps the greatest story of that season’s futures campaign. Robert Parker announced the wine on the back cover of his Wine Advocate, bestowing an unheard of 96-100 point score. The world took notice, and Pingus was on its way.

Pushing the Limits
From the beginning, Peter’s vision was to push old-vine Tempranillo to its upper limits. He spent the first few years pruning his vines back to a healthy balance—the trunks were straightened, lowered, and canes were pruned back to 1-2 buds per stump. Yields have typically been under one ton per acre. Over the past decade, Peter has continually refined his original vision. Since 2001, he has employed biodynamic viticulture to capture a healthier balance in his vineyards. In the winery, he has made subtle, but important, changes aimed at taming the region’s natural power, and giving more delineation and depth to the Pingus voice.

Peter’s winery work has been widely imitated, and many wines can mimic the exotic textures that Pingus possesses. Yet, while they might approach Pingus’ style, none of these newcomers has the substance that defines Pingus.

Wine Advocate 2/28/2017
"Peter Sisseck has done it again! He's crafted an otherworldly Pingus in the superb 2014 vintage in the Ribera del Duero region. All of the wines from that year are simply unbelievable, with possibly the best version of Flor de Pingus ever, and a Pingus that rivals the already perfect 2012. I just wonder where you can go from here, because I previewed a special lot of the 2015, floral and fresh—even drinkable now (I did it!)—that resembled the elegance and perfume of the 1996, one of my favorite early vintages. And even if it's still very early, he was ecstatic about the quality of the 2016 (which I was kicking myself for not having the chance to taste), something in common with all of the people that were ABLE to harvest early. So the future couldn't look brighter for Pingus!"


Media Links
BottledBy.com Wine Talks: Peter Sisseck
Ribera y Rueda: The Legends: Peter Sisseck and Dominio de Pingus
Spanish Wine Lover Photoblog: Peter Sisseck, Portrait of a Mature Winemaker

Reviews

  • Pingus 2011 'Pingus' Ribera Del Duero DO
    International Wine Cellar
    Rating: 94 (10/1/2013)

    Inky purple. An exotic, expressive bouquet displays scents of blueberry, black cherry, violet, licorice and Asian spices, with a subtle smoky nuance in the background. Offers an array of densely packed black and blue fruit and floral flavors that are enlivened by bright minerality. Shows outstanding clarity and energy on the intense, lingering finish.
  • Pingus 2011 'Pingus' Ribera Del Duero DO
    The Wine Advocate
    Rating: (94-96) (8/1/2012)

    The 2011 Pingus has a gorgeous, pure black cherry, cassis and blueberry scented bouquet interlaced by orange blossom and apricot. The oak is beautifully assimilated into the aromatic profile. The palate is full-bodied with a decadent entry. The tannins are ripe and rounded, imparting great tension and focus. There is both dimension and grace to this formidable Pingus that should blossom once it finishes its gestation. This is an outstanding Ribera del Duero wine. Drink 2020-2035+.
  • Pingus 2011 'Pingus' Ribera Del Duero DO
    The Wine Advocate
    Rating: 95 (8/14/2014)

    As with all the 2011s, the 2011 Pingus is riper, with never-seen-before alcohol levels (15.5%), but the wine feels extremely balanced. As usual, the highly-selected grapes were fermented in 2,000-liter oak vats with indigenous yeasts and aged for 22 months in second-and third-fill barrels. It is ripe and exuberant, with notes of violets, spices (curry!), smoky peat and umami-like meat-broth aromas. The palate is full-bodied, glyceric with sophisticated tannins, but plenty of them, so they need to calm down a little. I believe there will be a lot of people who will really love this 2011, it's showy and exuberant. 6,000 bottles produced. Drink 2016-2020.
  • Pingus 2016 'Flor de Pingus' Ribera Del Duero DO
    The Wine Advocate
    Rating: 95 (8/31/2018)

    I caught the 2016 Flor de Pingus days before it was due for bottling, so what I tasted was the final blend (done after the time in barrel was over) that was just settling in tank before being bottled. The paradox of 2016 is that it was a warm year, but the resulting wines have great freshness, which also happened in 1996 (one of my favorite old vintages of Pingus). The yields were higher, which brought more freshness to the wines; and the wines are airier and not as compact as, for example, 2015. In fact, what they have been doing for some time now is to work in viticulture—the pruning and what you do with the canopy—to achieve slightly higher yields and get the plants to balance, because as you increase the yields, the ripening takes longer. Even though it's young, this shows amazing perfume that should bloom with a year in bottle. This has all the signals to become one of the greatest vintages of Flor de Pingus. They expect to fill some 105,000 bottles in June 2018. I already look forward to tasting this in my next round, after it has spent a year or more in bottle.
  • Pingus 2016 'Pingus' Ribera Del Duero DO
    The Wine Advocate
    Rating: 98-100 (8/31/2018)

    I tasted an unbottled sample of the 2016 Pingus, which is still in barrel and due for bottling in August 2018. The different barrels had already been blended and put into the same barrels after the last racking three days before I encountered it. It has all the baby fat and is tender and primary, but you can sense the harmony and subtleness, the freshness and elegance it should develop, as the Ribera perfume is already incipient there. I couldn't help but think of the 1996, one of my favorite years. It's less concentrated than the 2015. It's also a little less ripe, and it probably has a tad less alcohol and more power. It's solid, but at the same time, it feels weightless; it has the inner strength and the subtleness of a ballerina. There should be some 7,000 bottles of this. This 21st vintage of Pingus might be one of the best ever, a modern version of the 1996...